Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XXXIX-B5, 529-534, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XXXIX-B5-529-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
 
30 Jul 2012
GEOSPATIAL DATA INTEGRATION FOR ASSESSING LANDSLIDE HAZARD ON ENGINEERED SLOPES
P. E. Miller, J. P. Mills, S. L. Barr, and S. J. Birkinshaw School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU, UK
Keywords: LIDAR, TLS, Integration, Engineering, Hazards, Landslides Abstract. Road and rail networks are essential components of national infrastructures, underpinning the economy, and facilitating the mobility of goods and the human workforce. Earthwork slopes such as cuttings and embankments are primary components, and their reliability is of fundamental importance. However, instability and failure can occur, through processes such as landslides. Monitoring the condition of earthworks is a costly and continuous process for network operators, and currently, geospatial data is largely underutilised. The research presented here addresses this by combining airborne laser scanning and multispectral aerial imagery to develop a methodology for assessing landslide hazard. This is based on the extraction of key slope stability variables from the remotely sensed data. The methodology is implemented through numerical modelling, which is parameterised with the slope stability information, simulated climate conditions, and geotechnical properties. This allows determination of slope stability (expressed through the factor of safety) for a range of simulated scenarios. Regression analysis is then performed in order to develop a functional model relating slope stability to the input variables. The remotely sensed raster datasets are robustly re-sampled to two-dimensional cross-sections to facilitate meaningful interpretation of slope behaviour and mapping of landslide hazard. Results are stored in a geodatabase for spatial analysis within a GIS environment. For a test site located in England, UK, results have shown the utility of the approach in deriving practical hazard assessment information. Outcomes were compared to the network operator’s hazard grading data, and show general agreement. The utility of the slope information was also assessed with respect to auto-population of slope geometry, and found to deliver significant improvements over the network operator’s existing field-based approaches.
Conference paper (PDF, 832 KB)


Citation: Miller, P. E., Mills, J. P., Barr, S. L., and Birkinshaw, S. J.: GEOSPATIAL DATA INTEGRATION FOR ASSESSING LANDSLIDE HAZARD ON ENGINEERED SLOPES, Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XXXIX-B5, 529-534, https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XXXIX-B5-529-2012, 2012.

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