Volume XXXIX-B4
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XXXIX-B4, 483-488, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XXXIX-B4-483-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XXXIX-B4, 483-488, 2012
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XXXIX-B4-483-2012
© Author(s) 2012. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  01 Aug 2012

01 Aug 2012

DIGITAL ELEVATION MODELS AND DERIVED PRODUCTS FROM LROC NAC STEREO OBSERVATIONS

K. N. Burns1, E. J. Speyerer1, M. S. Robinson1, T. Tran1, M. R. Rosiek2, B. A. Archinal2, E. Howington-Kraus2, and the LROC Science Team K. N. Burns et al.
  • 1School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 1100 S Cady, Tempe AZ 85287, USA
  • 2Astrogeology Science Center, United States Geological Survey, 2255 N Gemini Dr, Flagstaff AZ 86001, USA

Keywords: DEM/DTM, Three-dimensional, Application, Planetary, Mapping, Geomorphology, Modeling, Processing

Abstract. One of the primary objectives of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) is to acquire stereo observations with the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) to enable production of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). This work describes the processes and techniques used in reducing the NAC stereo observations to DEMs through a combination of USGS integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) and SOCET SET® from BAE Systems by a team at Arizona State University (ASU). LROC Science Operations Center personnel have thus far reduced 130 stereo observations to DEMs of more than 130 stereo pairs for 11 Constellation Program (CxP) sites and 53 other regions of scientific interest. The NAC DEM spatial sampling is typically 2 meters, and the vertical precision is 1–2 meters. Such high resolution provides the three-dimensional view of the lunar surface required for site selection, hazard avoidance and planning traverses that minimize resource consumption. In addition to exploration analysis, geologists can measure parameters such as elevation, slope, and volume to place constraints on composition and geologic history. The NAC DEMs are released and archived through NASA’s Planetary Data System.