The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLVI-M-1-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-M-1-2021, 851–857, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-M-1-2021-851-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-M-1-2021, 851–857, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-M-1-2021-851-2021

  28 Aug 2021

28 Aug 2021

MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF PHOTOGRAMMETRIC SURVEYS IN THE CONSERVATION OF WALL PAINTINGS

L. Wong1, W. Rose2, A. Dhanda3, A. Flavin1, L. Barazzetti4, C. Ouimet3, and M. Santana Quintero3 L. Wong et al.
  • 1Getty Conservation Institute, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Suite 700, Los Angeles, CA 90049-1684, USA
  • 2Freelance Conservator, Waikoloa, Hawaii, USA
  • 3Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), Carleton University, 1125 Colonel by Drive, Ottawa, K1J 5B6, Canada
  • 4Department of Architecture, Built Environment and Construction Engineering (DABC) Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 31, 20133 Milan, Italy

Keywords: wall paintings, digital documentation, photogrammetry, orthophotos, cultural heritage, world heritage, monitoring, site recording

Abstract. In the field of wall painting conservation, photogrammetric surveys are an increasingly common documentation tool. The outputs from these surveys, including captured images, orthophotos, and three-dimensional models, are used by conservators to monitor and record condition phenomena and conservation treatments. To serve these conservation needs, the outputs should have visual fidelity, meaning they are a close representation of the subject based on their spatial resolution, overall focus, even lighting and color accuracy. However, wall paintings present unique technical challenges for photogrammetry considering their often large scale, irregular topography, range of surface attributes, and access issues. As a documentation technique more commonly applied to capture the geometry of buildings and objects, using photogrammetry to record both the topography and fine surface details of a wall painting requires thorough planning. This paper examines specific challenges in documenting wall paintings and how collaboration between conservators and heritage-recording specialists has improved practice and maximized the value of photogrammetric surveys for conservation.