The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLVI-M-1-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-M-1-2021, 141–146, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-M-1-2021-141-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-M-1-2021, 141–146, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-M-1-2021-141-2021

  28 Aug 2021

28 Aug 2021

PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND MEDIEVAL ARCHITECTURE. USING BLACK AND WHITE ANALOGIC PHOTOGRAPHS FOR RECONSTRUCTING THE FOUNDATIONS OF THE LOST ROOD SCREEN AT SANTA CROCE, FLORENCE

F. Condorelli1, G. Pescarmona2, and Y. Ricci3 F. Condorelli et al.
  • 1DAD, Department of Architecture and Design, Politecnico di Torino, Italy
  • 2SAGAS, Department of History, Archaeology, Geography, Art and Performing Arts, University of Florence, Italy
  • 3DIDA, Department of Architecture, University of Florence, Italy

Keywords: History of Medieval Art, Medieval Archaeology, Photogrammetry, Metric Quality Assessment, Digital Model, Virtual Reality

Abstract. In this research paper photogrammetric techniques have been successfully applied to historic black and white analogic photographs to convey previously inaccessible architectural and archaeological information. The chosen case study for this paper is the Franciscan Basilica of Santa Croce in Florence, Italy. A photogrammetric algorithm has been implemented over a series of b/w negatives portraying the archaeological excavations carried out in the years 1967–1969, after the traumatic flood of the river Arno in 1966 that severely damaged the city centre of Florence and, particularly, the Santa Croce monumental site. The final aim of this operation is to provide solid evidence for the virtual reconstruction of the lost rood screen of the basilica of Santa Croce, the current subject of the PhD research of one of the Authors (Giovanni Pescarmona) at the University of Florence. The foundations that were uncovered during the archaeological excavation in the ‘60s are one of the most important hints towards a convincing retro-planning of the structure. Using advanced photogrammetric techniques, and combining them with LIDAR scanning, it is possible to uncover new datasets that were previously inaccessible for scholars, opening new paths of research. This interdisciplinary approach, combining traditional art-historical research methods and state-of-the-art computational tools, tries to bridge the gap between areas of research that still do not communicate enough with each other, defining new frameworks in the field of Digital Art History.