The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLVI-4/W4-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-4/W4-2021, 61–66, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-4-W4-2021-61-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-4/W4-2021, 61–66, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-4-W4-2021-61-2021

  07 Oct 2021

07 Oct 2021

NEW POTREE SHADER CAPABILITIES FOR 3D VISUALIZATION OF BEHAVIORS NEAR COVID-19 RICH HEALTHCARE FACILITIES

C. Carey1, J. Romero1, and D. F. Laefer1,2 C. Carey et al.
  • 1Center for Urban Science + Progress, New York University, USA
  • 2Dept. Civil and Urban Engineering, Tandon School of Engineering, New York University, USA

Keywords: Three-dimensional epidemiology, Point cloud, WebGL, COVID-19, Healthcare facility, Geoscientific information

Abstract. While data on human behavior in COVID-19 rich environments have been captured and publicly released, spatial components of such data are recorded in two-dimensions. Thus, the complete roles of the built and natural environment cannot be readily ascertained. This paper introduces a mechanism for the three-dimensional (3D) visualization of egress behaviors of individuals leaving a COVID-19 exposed healthcare facility in Spring 2020 in New York City. Behavioral data were extracted and projected onto a 3D aerial laser scanning point cloud of the surrounding area rendered with Potree, a readily available open-source Web Graphics Library (WebGL) point cloud viewer. The outcomes were 3D heatmap visualizations of the built environment that indicated the event locations of individuals exhibiting specific characteristics (e.g., men vs. women; public transit users vs. private vehicle users). These visualizations enabled interactive navigation through the space accessible through any modern web browser supporting WebGL. Visualizing egress behavior in this manner may highlight patterns indicative of correlations between the environment, human behavior, and transmissible diseases. Findings using such tools have the potential to identify high-exposure areas and surfaces such as doors, railings, and other physical features. Providing flexible visualization capabilities with 3D spatial context can enable analysts to quickly advise and communicate vital information across a broad range of use cases. This paper presents such an application to extract the public health information necessary to form localized responses to reduce COVID-19 infection and transmission rates in urban areas.