The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLVI-4/W2-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-4/W2-2021, 43–49, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-4-W2-2021-43-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLVI-4/W2-2021, 43–49, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLVI-4-W2-2021-43-2021

  19 Aug 2021

19 Aug 2021

GED – TOOLKIT: OPEN GEOSPATIAL DATA AND TOOLS TO SUPPORT GENERATIVE ECONOMY PROCESSES IN LOCAL COMMUNITIES

M. Clementi and E. Labrozzi M. Clementi and E. Labrozzi
  • DAStU, Department of Architecture and Urban Studies, Politecnico di Milano - Via Bonardi 3, 20133, Italy

Keywords: Generative Economy, Sustainable Environmental Design, Territorial LCA, FOSS GIS, Impact Geographies, Resources Geographies, Renewable Resources

Abstract. How can FOSS GIS support generative economy processes in small settled communities? The paper answers this question by proposing a toolbox made up of specific open geospatial data that can be processed through FOSS GIS. These data consist of specific maps, accompanied by numerical values.

The information collected is intended to lay the foundations for an open-access manual of procedures to support the creation of an open database. This manual, currently under development, is created within a research funded by the Department of Architecture and Urban Studies of the Politecnico di Milano and is an integral part of an experimental game aimed at supporting students in the development of local self-sustainability scenarios.

The manual is called the GED Toolkit. The acronym GED stands for Generative Environmental Design, with this term we refer to an approach to the design of the anthropized environment oriented towards the development of generative economies.

The paper presents good practices, measuring their consistency with Generative Economy Principles through resource and impacts mapping. These are useful in the first place to understand the systemic features of the practice itself and the relationship with the territory that hosts it, and secondly to verify the possible transferability to other contexts.