International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Volume XLIV-M-1-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIV-M-1-2020, 691–698, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIV-M-1-2020-691-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIV-M-1-2020, 691–698, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIV-M-1-2020-691-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  24 Jul 2020

24 Jul 2020

TEMPORARY EMERGENCY SHELTER AGARIYAS: A CASE STUDY FROM THE FLOOD PRONE SITE OF KUMANO, JAPAN

C. Ochiai C. Ochiai
  • Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Japan

Keywords: Flood Preparedness, Temporary Shelter, Architectural Features, Local Knowledge, Self-effort

Abstract. This study clarifies different issues associated with temporary emergency shelters called Agariyas during floods, in the Kumano, area along the Kumano River in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan. The locations and features of Agariyas were identified through fieldwork. To collect and confirm the location and past existences of Agariyas, interviews were conducted with the elderly. Also, a measurement survey was used to collect data on the types, location, floor plan, and material use of Agariyas. The study confirmed that many Agariyas were built after the 1889 flood, the water level of which influenced their locations. However, currently, very few remain. They were mainly minimally furnished with one to two rooms, a storage space, and a small kitchen for a temporary evacuation period. They were built on terraces or mounded ground. Their architectural features differ depending on the owner, but they were most commonly built using wood, and the roof was covered with cedar bark and rounded stones. Younger generations do not know about Agariyas. To increase the local knowledge and awareness of flood disaster culture, it is important to re-evaluate the tangible and intangible heritage in local communities, which includes the effort and wisdom of ancestors related to local disasters. The Kumano-Hongu Shrine and pilgrimage route attract visitors today. However, addressing the experiences and knowledge of local disaster may add value to the World Heritage site.