International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Volume XLIV-M-1-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIV-M-1-2020, 397–403, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIV-M-1-2020-397-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIV-M-1-2020, 397–403, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIV-M-1-2020-397-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  24 Jul 2020

24 Jul 2020

NEW TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE DOCUMENTATION AND PRESERVATION OF THE MAYA CULTURAL HERITAGE. THE PALACE OF THE GOVERNOR AT UXMAL (YUCATÁN, MEXICO)

G. Muñoz Cosme1,3 and C. Vidal Lorenzo2 G. Muñoz Cosme and C. Vidal Lorenzo
  • 1Departamento de Composición Arquitectónica, Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain
  • 2Departamento de Historia del Arte, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain
  • 3Research Centre PEGASO, Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain

Keywords: Heritage, Digital Technologies, Documentation, Maya Culture

Abstract. One of the major challenges currently facing the architectural and archaeological heritage in subtropical World Heritage sites is its preventive conservation. Many of these sites are vulnerable to the adverse impacts of natural disasters and climate change. The risk is compounded by the fact that several of them are among the most iconic places in the world, and so they also face the threat of the excessive growth of visitors. What is more, in earlier times many were restored with unsuitable materials or using inappropriate techniques which have heightened the risk they face today. However, thanks to the new digital technologies of architectural documentation involving the use of laser scanner and photogrammetry, applied in combination with traditional systems, the current state of the buildings can be documented and evaluated thoroughly and accurately. The information obtained can help to guide the choice of the measures and actions needed to prevent, or at least minimize, future deterioration or loss. An example of a project of this kind is the documentation work we are currently carrying out at the Palace of the Governor, an exceptional 98 m long building from the Late Classic period, located in the Maya city of Uxmal (Yucatán, Mexico). The palace is situated in a prominent position on a large, elevated platform. The results of this research are the subject of this paper.