International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Volume XLIV-M-1-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIV-M-1-2020, 203–209, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIV-M-1-2020-203-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIV-M-1-2020, 203–209, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIV-M-1-2020-203-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  24 Jul 2020

24 Jul 2020

DOCUMENTATION OF TRADITIONAL HOUSING IN MAYANGNA COMMUNITIES. BOSAWÁS BIOSPHERE RESERVE, NICARAGUA

G. Cimadomo1, N. González Meixuero2, J. L. Jamauca2, C. Castaño Gil2, and M. Martín Sánchez3 G. Cimadomo et al.
  • 1Departamento Arte y Arquitectura, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
  • 2ETS Arquitectura, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
  • 3ETS Arquitectura, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Spain

Keywords: Vernacular dwelling, Mayangna, Documentation, North Caribbean Coast Autonomous Region, Nicaragua

Abstract. The Mayangna ethnic community populate the UNESCO Bosawás Biosphere Reserve in the north of Nicaragua, in the North Caribbean Coast Autonomous Region. During the volunteer program developed by the School of Architecture at the University of Malaga, Spain in the summer of 2019, the architecture of a traditional Mayangna house in Santa María (Bonanza municipal term) was documented. Documentation and digital reconstruction of this typology is still inadequate and this is considered a crucial task given that many of these traditional buildings are at risk of disappearing, as the comparison with more recent buildings in Sakalwas (Bonanza) shows. The paper describes, focusing on a typological and construction analysis, the original houses and the domestic culture of this community, characterized by the use of pressed bamboo for the external walls and Suita palm leaves for the roofs. Other characteristics are the lack of internal distribution and the use of piles to elevate the single roof from the ground. A slow process of transformation has been detected, leading to increased environmental costs and less effective solutions for combating tropical climatology and heavy raining periods. Finally, we discuss how the active protection of the Biosphere Reserve should be compatible with the preservation of traditional houses, for a more socially and environmentally sustainable future.