The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLIII-B4-2022
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B4-2022, 501–506, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B4-2022-501-2022
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B4-2022, 501–506, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B4-2022-501-2022
 
02 Jun 2022
02 Jun 2022

SPATIAL EQUITY OF CITY PUBLIC OPEN SPACES BASED ON G2SFCA: A CASE STUDY OF WUHAN, CHINA

J. Dong1,2, Y. Yang1,2, M. Luo3, Q. Cheng3, X. Zhang3, and Y. Wang1,2 J. Dong et al.
  • 1College of Resources Environment and Tourism, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048, China
  • 2Key Laboratory of 3Dimensional Information Acquisition and Application, Ministry of Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048, China
  • 3Wuhan Geomatics Institute, Wuhan 430022, China

Keywords: Spatial equity, Accessibility, Public open spaces, G2SFCA, Supply, Demand

Abstract. Urban public open spaces refer to open space between architectural structures in a city or urban agglomeration that is open for urban residents to conduct public exchanges and hold various activities, and their spatial distribution characteristics are important indicators to measure the sustainable development of urban ecological society. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the rationality of urban public open space layout for practical guidance. Address this problem, taking Wuhan as an example, this paper uses high-resolution grid population density data and web map API to construct an evaluation system for the spatial equity of urban public open spaces based on the accessibility index calculated from G2SFCA. The results showed that the layout of public open spaces in Wuhan is not reasonable, and there are significant spatial differences in the accessibility index of different types of public open spaces, as well as a certain degree of imbalance between them and the spatial distribution of population, indicating that there is a "mismatch" and "dislocation" in the supply-demand relationship of public open spaces in Wuhan. These results explain the fairness of public open space layout in Wuhan and provide a scientific basis for a more reasonable and equitable allocation of urban public open spaces in Wuhan.