The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLIII-B4-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B4-2020, 583–590, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B4-2020-583-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B4-2020, 583–590, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B4-2020-583-2020

  25 Aug 2020

25 Aug 2020

A MULTI-PURPOSE CULTURAL HERITAGE DATA PLATFORM FOR 4D VISUALIZATION AND INTERACTIVE INFORMATION SERVICES

C. Ioannidis, S. Verykokou, S. Soile, and A.-M. Boutsi C. Ioannidis et al.
  • Laboratory of Photogrammetry, School of Rural & Surveying Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Greece

Keywords: Geospatial data, documentation, visualization, 4D modelling, cultural heritage

Abstract. The already arduous task of collecting, processing and managing heterogeneous cultural heritage data is getting more intense in terms of indexing, interaction and dissemination. This paper presents the creation of a 4D web-based platform as a centralized data hub, moving beyond advanced photogrammetric techniques for 3D capture and multi-dimensional documentation. Precise metric data, generated by a combination of image-based, range and surveying techniques, are spatially, logically and temporally correlated with cultural and historical resources, in order to form a critical knowledge base for multiple purposes and user types. Unlike conventional information systems, the presented platform, which adopts a relational database model, has the following front-end functionalities: (i) visualization of high-resolution 3D models based on distance dependent Level of Detail (LoD) techniques; (ii) web Augmented Reality; and (iii) interactive access and retrieval services. Information deduced from the developed services is tailored to different target audiences: scientific community, private sector, public sector and general public. The case study site is the UNESCO world heritage site of Meteora, Greece, and particularly, two inaccessible huge rocks, the rock of St. Modestos, known as Modi, and the Alyssos rock.