The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLIII-B2-2022
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B2-2022, 745–752, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B2-2022-745-2022
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B2-2022, 745–752, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B2-2022-745-2022
 
30 May 2022
30 May 2022

HIGH-RESOLUTION DIGITAL SURVEY OF FLOORS: A NEW PROTOTYPE FOR EFFICIENT PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ACQUISITION

A. Adami, L. Fregonese, J. Helder, O. Rosignoli, L. Taffurelli, and D. Treccani A. Adami et al.
  • He.Su.Tech. group, MantovaLab, Dept. of Architecture Built environment and Construction engineering (ABC), Politecnico di Milano, 46100 Mantua, Italy

Keywords: digital photogrammetry, image acquisition, pavings, cross polarization, historic floor

Abstract. High-resolution surveying of historical floors is a very common practice in both research and everyday life. The type of floors typically concerned are made of mosaic, marble and stone. Because of their intrinsic characteristics, their survey typically requires very high-resolution results, to ensure excellent support for restoration, as well as in-depth knowledge of the artifact. In these cases, the focus must be kept on both geometric and radiometric content, to enable accurate metric representation and a rendering of colour and surfaces as close as possible to reality. In this research we propose a prototype of a photogrammetric acquisition system (under development) which tries to optimise the floor survey in terms of both geometric and colour documentation. In particular, the prototype makes use of the cross-polarisation technique with the aim of eliminating reflections from the images. The principle behind the prototype is the creation of a movable laboratory, a segregated space that allows excellent photographic acquisition even in difficult environmental conditions, which cannot always be controlled optimally. First tests showed its suitability and usefulness to reach the goal of a high resolution survey of historic floors.