The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLIII-B2-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B2-2021, 145–152, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B2-2021-145-2021
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B2-2021, 145–152, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B2-2021-145-2021

  28 Jun 2021

28 Jun 2021

CONNECTING GEOMETRY AND SEMANTICS VIA ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: FROM 3D CLASSIFICATION OF HERITAGE DATA TO H-BIM REPRESENTATIONS

V. Croce1, M. G. Bevilacqua2, G. Caroti1, and A. Piemonte1 V. Croce et al.
  • 1DICI, ASTRO Laboratory, University of Pisa, Italy
  • 2DESTEC, University of Pisa, Italy

Keywords: H-BIM, Semantic Segmentation, Architectural Heritage, Artificial Intelligence, Scan-to-BIM, Machine Learning

Abstract. Cultural heritage information systems, such as H-BIM, are becoming more and more widespread today, thanks to their potential to bring together, around a 3D representation, the wealth of knowledge related to a given object of study. However, the reconstruction of such tools starting from 3D architectural surveying is still largely deemed as a lengthy and time-consuming process, with inherent complexities related to managing and interpreting unstructured and unorganized data derived, e.g., from laser scanning or photogrammetry. Tackling this issue and starting from reality-based surveying, the purpose of this paper is to semi-automatically reconstruct parametric representations for H-BIM-related uses, by means of the most recent 3D data classification techniques that exploit Artificial Intelligence (AI). The presented methodology consists of a first semantic segmentation phase, aiming at the automatic recognition through AI of architectural elements of historic buildings within points clouds; a Random Forest classifier is used for the classification task, evaluating each time the performance of the predictive model. At a second stage, visual programming techniques are applied to the reconstruction of a conceptual mock-up of each detected element and to the subsequent propagation of the 3D information to other objects with similar characteristics. The resulting parametric model can be used for heritage preservation and dissemination purposes, as common practices implemented in modern H-BIM documentation systems. The methodology is tailored to representative case studies related to the typology of the medieval cloister and scattered over the Tuscan territory.