The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLIII-B2-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B2-2020, 1033–1040, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B2-2020-1033-2020
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B2-2020, 1033–1040, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B2-2020-1033-2020

  12 Aug 2020

12 Aug 2020

A COMPARISON OF LOW-COST CAMERAS APPLIED TO FIXED MULTI-IMAGE MONITORING SYSTEMS

N. Bruno1, K. Thoeni2, F. Diotri1, M. Santise2, R. Roncella1, and A. Giacomini2 N. Bruno et al.
  • 1Dept. of Engineering and Architecture, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze, 181/A, 43124 Parma, Italy
  • 2Centre for Geotechnical Science and Engineering, The University of Newcastle, 2308 Callaghan, Australia

Keywords: Low-Cost, Digital Surface Model, Accuracy Assessment, Monitoring, 3D Reconstruction

Abstract. Photogrammetry is becoming a widely used technique for slope monitoring and rock fall data collection. Its scalability, simplicity of components and low costs for hardware and operations makes its use constantly increasing for both civil and mining applications. Recent on site permanent installation of cameras resulted particularly viable for the monitoring of extended surfaces at very reasonable costs. The current work investigates the performances of a customised Raspberry Pi camera module V2 system and three additional low-cost camera systems including an ELP-USB8MP02G camera module, a compact digital camera (Nikon S3100) and a DSLR (Nikon D3). All system, except the Nikon D3, are available at comparable price. The comparison was conducted by collecting images of rock surfaces, one located in Australia and three located in Italy, from distances between 55 and 110 m. Results are presented in terms of image quality and three dimensional reconstruction error. Thereby, the multi-view reconstructions are compared to a reference model acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner.