The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLIII-B1-2022
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B1-2022, 207–212, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B1-2022-207-2022
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLIII-B1-2022, 207–212, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLIII-B1-2022-207-2022
 
30 May 2022
30 May 2022

A PRIMARY TEST RESULTS OF A HANDHELD MOBILE LASER SCANNER IN EXTRACTION OF TREE PARAMETERS

R. Eker1, Z. Ucar1, and A. Aydın2 R. Eker et al.
  • 1Izmir Katip Celebi University, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Engineering, Izmir, Turkey
  • 2Düzce University, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest Engineering, Remote Sensing & GIS Laboratory, Düzce, Turkey

Keywords: Diameter at breast height, Forest inventory, Handheld mobile laser scanning, Precision forestry, SLAM, 3D Forest

Abstract. Sustainable forest planning and management require accurate and precise information about the estimation of forest resources. In particular, two tree parameters are very important among the others: diameter-at-breast height (DBH) and height that are used to estimate the volume and biomass of the tree. With the development of Remote Sensing (RS), information about the tree parameters can be acquired in more accurately and precisely with laser scanning technology. In this study, a Handheld Mobile Laser Scanner (HMLS), called TORCH, was tested for extracting tree parameters with 3D Forest software. The TORCH uses the SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) algorithm to locate the scanner in an unknown environment and register the obtained 3D point clouds. Estimated DBH and height parameters from HMLS data extracted using 3D Forest software were compared with the field measurements (i.e., reference data). The preliminary results of the study showed that estimated DBH from HMLS data were relatively higher than ground measurement, while estimated height from point clouds data was slightly lower than the reference data. The continuous improvement in mobile laser scanners will improve the success of the devices while acquiring 3D structural information of tree parameters and reducing the cost and time spent in forest inventory.