Volume XLII-3
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3, 1259-1262, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-1259-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3, 1259-1262, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-1259-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  30 Apr 2018

30 Apr 2018

SEA ICE THICKNESS MEASUREMENT BY GROUND PENETRATING RADAR FOR GROUND TRUTH OF MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING DATA

M. Matsumoto1, M. Yoshimura1, K. Naoki2, K. Cho2, and H. Wakabayashi3 M. Matsumoto et al.
  • 1PASCO CORPORATION, 2-8-10, Higashiyama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2Tokai University, 2-28-4, Tomigaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • 3Nihon University, 1 Nakagawara, Tokusada, Tamura, Koriyama, Japan

Keywords: Sea ice thickness measurement, Microwave remote sensing, Ground truth, Ground Penetrating Radar, Brackish lake, Finite-Difference Time-Domain method, Dielectric constant

Abstract. Observation of sea ice thickness is one of key issues to understand regional effect of global warming. One of approaches to monitor sea ice in large area is microwave remote sensing data analysis. However, ground truth must be necessary to discuss the effectivity of this kind of approach. The conventional method to acquire ground truth of ice thickness is drilling ice layer and directly measuring the thickness by a ruler. However, this method is destructive, time-consuming and limited spatial resolution. Although there are several methods to acquire ice thickness in non-destructive way, ground penetrating radar (GPR) can be effective solution because it can discriminate snow-ice and ice-sea water interface. In this paper, we carried out GPR measurement in Lake Saroma for relatively large area (200 m by 300 m, approximately) aiming to obtain grand truth for remote sensing data. GPR survey was conducted at 5 locations in the area. The direct measurement was also conducted simultaneously in order to calibrate GPR data for thickness estimation and to validate the result. Although GPR Bscan image obtained from 600MHz contains the reflection which may come from a structure under snow, the origin of the reflection is not obvious. Therefore, further analysis and interpretation of the GPR image, such as numerical simulation, additional signal processing and use of 200 MHz antenna, are required to move on thickness estimation.