The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
Download
Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation
Articles | Volume XLII-3/W7
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3/W7, 41–45, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-W7-41-2019
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3/W7, 41–45, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-W7-41-2019

  01 Mar 2019

01 Mar 2019

ANALYSIS OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VEGETATION DISTRIBUTION AND LAND PRICE USING MULTITEMPORAL DATA

K. Kumagai1 and H. Uematsu2 K. Kumagai and H. Uematsu
  • 1Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Setsunan University, 17-8 Ikeda-Nakamachi, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8508, Japan
  • 2Kyoto City Board of Education, Kyoto, Japan

Keywords: NDVI, Spatial Analysis, GWR, Land Price, Multitemporal Data

Abstract. Japanese cities are facing a rapidly aging society with birthrates, lower than the average rates of developed world. Population decline generates many problems such as depopulation in rural areas. One of the measures implemented is to define core areas for maintaining sufficient population density given current and predicted population dynamics. On the other hand, there is a potential for the surroundings of the core areas to be run-down because vacancies generate many problems such as crime, susceptibility to fire, and other negative events. There have been, however, few measures concerning the spatial distribution of parks and open spaces around the core areas. We applied a hedonic approach with a Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) to the analysis of the relationship between the assessed values of land and geographical information in order to estimate the importance of landscape factors: the spatial continuity of vegetation distributions, public parks, and the local averages of NDVI. It was shown that the number of points where the spatial continuity of vegetation distributions makes positive impacts on nearby land prices is gradually increasing during years 2000 and 2015, while the average of land price continues to fall.