Volume XLII-3/W2
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3/W2, 83–89, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-W2-83-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3/W2, 83–89, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-W2-83-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  15 Nov 2017

15 Nov 2017

CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON URBAN LEVEL: CITIZEN HEALTH AND BUILDING ENERGY DEMAND

R. S. José1, J. L. Pérez1, L. Pérez1, R. M. Gonzalez Barras2, J. Pecci3, and M. Palacios3 R. S. José et al.
  • 1Environmental Software and Modelling Group, Computer Science School, Technical University of Madrid (UPM), Madrid, Spain
  • 2Department of Physics and Meteorology, Faculty of Physics, Complutense University of Madrid (UCM), Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain
  • 3Indra S.A., C/ Mar Egeo, 4, Pol. Industrial 1, 28830 San Fernando de Henares, Madrid, Spain

Keywords: Climate change, urban dynamical downscaling, building energy demand, health impact

Abstract. The future impacts of climate change on citizen health and building energy demand have been researched considering two possible IPCC global climate scenarios: RCP 4.5 (stabilization emission scenario) and RCP 8.5 (little effort to reduce emissions). The climate scenarios have been dynamically downscaled from 1° to 50 meters of spatial resolution over three European cities: Madrid, Milan and London. Air quality has also been simulated up to streets levels. Climate and air pollution information are used as input to the health impact and building energy demand assessment tools. The impacts are calculated as future (2030, 2050 and 2100) minus present (2011). The short term health impact assessment includes mortality and morbidity related with changes in the temperature and air pollution concentrations. The larger increase of costs of mortality and morbidity was noted in the increasing scenario (RCP8.5) for year 2100, because RCP 8.5 is characterized by temperature increments. Maps of the spatial distribution of the costs of the climate change have showed Building energy demand simulations have been achieved with the EnergyPlus model using specific prototype buildings based on ASHRAE 90.1 Prototype Building Modeling Specifications and urban climate information by each building. .The results show an increase in cooling demand with RCP 8.5 because future will be cooler that the present.