International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Volume XLII-3/W11
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3/W11, 131–136, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-W11-131-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-3/W11, 131–136, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-3-W11-131-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  14 Feb 2020

14 Feb 2020

OBJECT-BASED IMAGE ANALYSIS APPROACH TO DETERMINE THE FALLOW PERIODS FOR SHIFTING CULTIVATION IN INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES IN GUYANA

H. Persaud1, R. Thomas1, P. Bholanath2, T. Smartt2, and P. Watt3 H. Persaud et al.
  • 1Ministry of Natural Resources, Geospatial Information Management Unit, Georgetown, Guyana
  • 2Guyana Forestry Commission, Georgetown, Guyana
  • 3Indufor Asia Pacific, Auckland, New Zealand

Keywords: Guyana, Shifting cultivation, Object-based image analysis, Time series satellite data, Landcover change

Abstract. Shifting cultivation is an agricultural practice that is the basis of subsistence for the Indigenous population in Guyana and has impacted on a total forest area of 13,922ha to varying degrees of impact on forest carbon. Generally, within these communities, there are two types of shifting cultivation: pioneer and rotational. Pioneer shifting cultivation involves the cutting of primary forest and subsequent cropping and then abandonment. Rotational shifting cultivation involves revisiting areas on a rotational cycle. In Guyana, shifting cultivation is not included in the sustainable land use system since no work has been done to understand the rotational cycles. This study utilized an Object-based image analysis (OBIA) of time-series satellite data (Landsat TM5 and OLI) for the period 2004 to 2017 to determine the dynamics of land cover, time-series changes, and prevailing shifting cultivation cycle in the indigenous communities of Jawalla and Phillipai in the western section of Guyana. OBIA proved to be an efficient method for shifting cultivation and sustainable forest management analyses in Guyana. The findings of this study indicate that short fallows are associated with shifting cultivation in Guyana and the size of the patches cleared each year has been increasing. These trends have potential ecological and livelihood implications that can impact the flow of ecosystem services and the sustainability of livelihoods.