Volume XLII-2
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2, 945-952, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-945-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2, 945-952, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-945-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  30 May 2018

30 May 2018

OPTO-TECHNICAL MONITORING – A STANDARDIZED METHODOLOGY TO ASSESS THE TREATMENT OF HISTORICAL STONE SURFACES

M. Rahrig1, R. Drewello1, and A. Lazzeri2 M. Rahrig et al.
  • 1KDWT, Centre for Heritage Conservation Studies and Technologies, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • 2Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Pisa, Italy

Keywords: Monitoring, Cultural Heritage, 3D Scanning, UV-VIS-IR photography, Preservation Sciences, Non-Destructive Testing Methods

Abstract. Monitoring is an essential requirement for the planning, assessment and evaluation of conservation measures. It should be based on a standardized and reproducible observation of the historical surface. For many areas and materials suitable methods for long-term monitoring already exist. But hardly any non-destructive testing methods have been used to test new materials for conservation of damaged stone surfaces. The Nano-Cathedral project, funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, is developing new materials and technologies for preserving damaged stone surfaces of built heritage. The prototypes developed are adjusted to the needs and problems of a total of six major cultural monuments in Europe. In addition to the testing of the materials under controlled laboratory conditions, the products have been applied to trial areas on the original stone surfaces. For a location-independent standardized assessment of surface changes of the entire trial areas a monitoring method based on opto-technical, non-contact and non-destructive testing methods has been developed. This method involves a three-dimensional measurement of the surface topography using Structured-Light-Scanning and the analysis of the surfaces in different light ranges using high resolution VIS photography, as well as UV-A-fluorescence photography and reflected near-field IR photography.
The paper will show the workflow of this methodology, including a detailed description of the equipment used data processing and the advantages for monitoring highly valuable stone surfaces. Alongside the theoretical discussion, the results of two measuring campaigns on trial areas of the Nano-Cathedral project will be shown.