Volume XLII-2
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2, 623-628, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-623-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2, 623-628, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-623-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  30 May 2018

30 May 2018

INVESTIGATIONS ON THE BUNDLE ADJUSTMENT RESULTS FROM SFM-BASED SOFTWARE FOR MAPPING PURPOSES

Y. A. Lumban-Gaol1, A. Murtiyoso2, and B. H. Nugroho1 Y. A. Lumban-Gaol et al.
  • 1Geospatial Information Agency (BIG), Jl. Raya Jakarta-Bogor Cibinong, Indonesia
  • 2Photogrammetry and Geomatics Group, ICube Laboratory UMR 7357, INSA Strasbourg, France

Keywords: bundle adjustment, photogrammetry, mapping, DBAT, Inpho, ERDAS, PhotoScan

Abstract. Since its first inception, aerial photography has been used for topographic mapping. Large-scale aerial photography contributed to the creation of many of the topographic maps around the world. In Indonesia, a 2013 government directive on spatial management has re-stressed the need for topographic maps, with aerial photogrammetry providing the main method of acquisition. However, the large need to generate such maps is often limited by budgetary reasons. Today, SfM (Structure-from-Motion) offers quicker and less expensive solutions to this problem. However, considering the required precision for topographic missions, these solutions need to be assessed to see if they provide enough level of accuracy. In this paper, a popular SfM-based software Agisoft PhotoScan is used to perform bundle adjustment on a set of large-scale aerial images. The aim of the paper is to compare its bundle adjustment results with those generated by more classical photogrammetric software, namely Trimble Inpho and ERDAS IMAGINE. Furthermore, in order to provide more bundle adjustment statistics to be compared, the Damped Bundle Adjustment Toolbox (DBAT) was also used to reprocess the PhotoScan project. Results show that PhotoScan results are less stable than those generated by the two photogrammetric software programmes. This translates to lower accuracy, which may impact the final photogrammetric product.