Volume XLII-2/W7
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W7, 29-36, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W7-29-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W7, 29-36, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W7-29-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  12 Sep 2017

12 Sep 2017

BIOMASS BURNING RELATED POLLUTIONS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCAL AIR QUALITY IN HONG KONG

K. L. Chan1 and K. Qin2 K. L. Chan and K. Qin
  • 1Meteorological Institute, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany
  • 2School of Environment Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou, China

Keywords: Biomass burning, source contributions, long range transport, black carbon, carbon monoxide

Abstract. In this study, we present a quantitative estimation of the impacts of biomass burning emissions from different source regions to the local air quality in Hong Kong in 2014 using global chemistry transport model simulations, sun photometer measurements, satellite observations and local monitoring network data. This study focuses on two major biomass burning pollutants, black carbon aerosols and carbon monoxide (CO). The model simulations of atmospheric black carbon and CO show excellent agreement with sun photometer aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements, satellite CO columns observations and local monitoring stations data. From the model simulation results, we estimated that biomass burning contributes 12 % of total black carbon and 16 % of atmospheric CO in Hong Kong on annual average. South East Asia shows the largest influence to the black carbon and CO levels in Hong Kong, accounts for 11 % of the total atmospheric black carbon and 8 % of CO. Biomass burning in North East Asia and Africa also show significant impacts to Hong Kong. Elevated levels of atmospheric black carbon aerosols and CO were observed during springtime (March and April) which is mainly due to the enhancement of biomass burning contributions. Black carbon and CO originating from biomass burning sources are estimated to contribute 40 % of atmospheric black carbon and 28 % of CO in Hong Kong during March 2014. An investigation focusing on the biomass burning pollution episode during springtime suggests the intensified biomass burning activities in the Indochinese Peninsula are the major sources of black carbon and CO in Hong Kong during the time.