Volume XLII-2/W5
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W5, 129-134, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W5-129-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W5, 129-134, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W5-129-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  18 Aug 2017

18 Aug 2017

DIGITAL DOCUMENTATION OF SHIPS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE: A EUROPEAN REVIEW

A. Colson A. Colson
  • German Maritime Museum, Hans-Scharoun-Platz 1; 27568 Bremerhaven, Germany

Keywords: Ships, Digital Documentation, Cultural Heritage, Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM), Total Station Theodolite (TST), Laser scanning

Abstract. Ships of different shapes and times are lying in harbours, on land or in museums, all over the world. Our aim with this paper was to review work done on digital documentation of ships in Cultural Heritage based on different initiatives in Europe using Coordinate Measuring Machine (Newport Ship and Doel 1); Total Station Theodolite (Vasa and Mary-Rose) and Laser scanning (LaScanMar and Traditional boats of Ireland). Our results showed that some discrepancy exist between the projects, in terms of techniques and expertise at hand. Furthermore, few guidelines have been in practice but only for Archaeology and Ethnology. However, no standards are existing. Three focuses have emerged: documentation of single ship elements, monitoring of the long-term deformation processes and the documentation of collections of ships. We discussed the diversity of expert’s background and the complexity of comparability between projects.

In conclusion, guidelines are necessary to enable a common ground for all professions to work together, e.g. in Architecture. This path must be taken now for digital documentation of ships, if not information and knowledge will be lost on the way.