Volume XLII-2/W15
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 633–638, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-633-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 633–638, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-633-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  23 Aug 2019

23 Aug 2019

EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF USING MIRRORS IN 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF SMALL ARTEFACTS

G. Kontogianni1, M. Lindstaedt2, T. P. Kersten2, and A. Georgopoulos1 G. Kontogianni et al.
  • 1Laboratory of Photogrammetry, School of Rural and Surveying Engineering, National Technical University of Athens 15780 Zografou Athens, Greece
  • 2Laboratory of Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning, HafenCity University Hamburg, 20457 Hamburg,

Keywords: 3D reconstruction, front surface mirror, small artefact

Abstract. Small artefacts pose many challenges to 3D documentation techniques due to their often complex details, which are very difficult to capture completely in 3D. Small objects may also have characteristics that are not optimal for 3D documentation, e.g. glossiness, shininess, textureless surfaces, etc. Furthermore, hidden parts of the artefact cause occlusions and obstructions, which may complicate the data acquisition process, since additional images or scan data are necessary in order to compensate for these restrictions. All these aspects increase acquisition and data processing times. Currently, the two main categories of 3D documentation methods are Image Based Modelling (IBM) and Range Based Modelling (RBM). In this paper, preliminary investigations aimed at evaluating the accuracy and performance of a front surface mirror in Image Based Modelling for small artefacts are presented. These results are then compared to a reference model generated from the artefact using a structured light system.