Volume XLII-2/W15
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 437–442, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-437-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 437–442, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-437-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  22 Aug 2019

22 Aug 2019

3D RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ROMAN DOMUS IN THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE OF LYLIBAEUM (MARSALA, ITALY)

D. Ebolese1, M. Lo Brutto2, and G. Dardanelli2 D. Ebolese et al.
  • 1Department Cultures and Societies, University of Palermo, Italy
  • 2Department of Engineering, University of Palermo, Italy

Keywords: Terrestrial laser scanning, 3D Reconstruction, Point cloud, Scan registration, Archaeology, 3D modelling

Abstract. Generally, terrestrial laser scanning surveys involve a rather large number of scans to ensure a high percentage of overlap required for the scan registration phase (target-based or point-based registration, cloud-to-cloud registration). These approaches result in data redundancy that could slow down both the acquisition and post-processing phases. In recent years, the technological evolution in the field of laser scanners has been directed to the development of devices that are able to perform an onsite pre-registration, to optimize the survey procedures and the reliability of the registration of the scan. The paper presents the results achieved during a terrestrial laser scanning survey carried out for the documentation and 3D reconstruction of the large and complex archaeological remains of the so-called Roman Domus in the archaeological site of Lylibaeum (Marsala, Italy). The survey was also conducted using a terrestrial laser scanner capable of pre-registering scans using a topographic approach. The pre-registration procedure and the data acquisition strategy have allowed to optimize the workflow and to obtain a 3D model of the Roman Domus with a high level of detail and area coverage.