Volume XLII-2/W15
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 381–388, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-381-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 381–388, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-381-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  22 Aug 2019

22 Aug 2019

HANDHELD VOLUMETRIC SCANNER FOR 3D PRINTED INTEGRATIONS OF HISTORICAL ELEMENTS: COMPARISON AND RESULTS

D. De Luca1, M. Del Giudice1, N. Grasso2, F. Matrone2, A. Osello1, and M. Piras2 D. De Luca et al.
  • 1Department of Structural, Geotechnical and Building Engineering (DISEG), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy
  • 2Department of Environment Land and Infrastructure Engineering (DIATI), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy

Keywords: Point clouds, handheld scanner, structured light, digital model, 3D printing, restoration, Cultural Heritage

Abstract. The latest technologies in the field of geomatics and additive manufacturing can provide a significant support to the restoration and conservation activities of Cultural Heritage (CH). In particular, the recent developments for both the 3D scanning techniques and the 3D printing systems are able to speed up the survey and the reconstruction of historical fragments gone lost. This research compares different meshes, obtained with different instruments and techniques, in particular a medium and a short-range volumetric handheld camera, with the aim of evaluating the best solution for the 3D printing and provide some guidelines for this kind of operation. Therefore, the focus is mainly on identifying the most effective solution to describe, represent and subsequently model small architectural details in the most automatic way, in order to step from the survey to the final printed result in the shortest time possible. Moreover, an attempt to integrate and complete not only sculptural details, by now well stated in the state of art, but also architectural elements, respecting the principles of reversibility and material recognisability typical of the modern restoration theories, has been done. The case study examined is an historical wooden gilded door with the lack of some decorative parts, in a church in the centre of Turin (Italy), symbol of the baroque architecture and damaged by a fire occurred during the Second World War.