Volume XLII-2/W15
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 1235–1239, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-1235-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W15, 1235–1239, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W15-1235-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  26 Aug 2019

26 Aug 2019

COMPREHENSIVE COMPARISON BETWEEN THE QING IMPERIAL GARDEN AND THE ENGLISH LANDSCAPE GARDEN IN THE 18TH CENTURY: A CULTURAL HERITAGE STUDIES APPROACH

Y. Yin1,2 Y. Yin
  • 1College of Humanities, University of Exeter, Exeter,UK
  • 2School of Architecture,Tianjin University, Tianjin, China

Keywords: Qing Imperial Garden, English Landscape Garden, Cultural Heritage, Views of Nature, Cultural History, Values

Abstract. In 17–18th century, the spread of the image of the Qing Imperial Garden witnessed the cross-cultural exchanges and promoted the development of English Landscape Garden style. The reciprocal ‘far away foreign land’ between Chinese and British cultures and the influence of historical context had caused the discrepant view of European on Chinese gardens. This project focuses on the differences of cultural heritage values found in the two kinds of gardens: from the design of space and structure, poems and paintings representing designers' concepts, humanities factors, design conception, gardening elements and etc. Which hopes to fill up the gaps of relevant studies and stress the importance of documentation for gardens between the East and West. There are three aspects to illustrate the inner differences under the surface similarities between the two kinds of gardens. Firstly, the distortion and discontinuity through out the introduction and translation.This research attempts to cross-examine such an argument through an investigation into the journey to the West by the carrier of Chinese Imperial garden ideas. Then the meaning of ‘views of nature’ in the English Landscape Garden was inconsistent with the Chinese concept of ‘natural state of the world’. Thirdly, the differences of historical background, culture and values between the Qing Imperial Garden and the English Landscape Garden. All in all, this research could well invite a more factually-based understanding of the Sino-English architectural interactions as well as the Chinese contributions to the world architecture.