Volume XLII-2/W11
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W11, 989-993, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W11-989-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-2/W11, 989-993, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-2-W11-989-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  05 May 2019

05 May 2019

ADVANCED 3D TECHNOLOGY IN SUPPORT OF THE BIM PROCESSES IN THE CULTURAL HERITAGE: IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS OF THE CASE STUDY OF THE ROMAN FLUVIAL PORT OF AQUILEIA (ITALY)

S. Pratali Maffei1, E. Canevese2, T. De Gottardo2, and L. Pizzol3 S. Pratali Maffei et al.
  • 1Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste, Italy
  • 2Virtualgeo, Sacile (PN), Italy
  • 3Freelance researcher, Montebelluna (TV), Italy

Keywords: BIM for Cultural Heritage (HBIM), Advanced 3D, conservation, architectural heritage, Virtualgeo, Aquileia, Roman fluvial port

Abstract. Advanced 3D technology, in line with the directives of the European Commission's Reflective 7 - Horizon 2020 project, allows to represent in an organized and accurate way (geometrically and chromatically speaking) any type of artefact belonging to the Cultural Heritage. This article will deal with the specific case-study of the research carried out in the archaeological site of the Roman fluvial port of Aquileia, in collaboration with the University of Trieste. Thirtysix MA Architecture students attending the experimental course in “Technologies for the conservation and enhancement of architectural heritage” were involved. The Advanced 3D model of the fluvial port was conveniently divided into 15 sectors, in order to allow the assignment of each sector to a different group of students. The students, using the tools provided by the proprietary EasyCUBE PRO software, were able to create a digital database with an accurate 3D representation of all types of degradation affecting the archaeological structures existing in situ. Starting from the digital database, the students created a report containing the surfaces, volumes, count of the specific elements and all the other textual and graphical data related to the degradation processes. The collected data allowed to produce a metric estimate of the restoration intervention and to realize visual simulations of the post-intervention result. This experience gave the chance to evaluate the advantages of creating a digital database of 3D representations of the various forms of degradation, also in terms of possible future developments.