Volume XLII-1
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-1, 211-215, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-1-211-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLII-1, 211-215, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLII-1-211-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  26 Sep 2018

26 Sep 2018

MOSAICKING VERY-HIGH-RESOLUTION HELICOPTER-BORNE IMAGES ACQUIRED OVER DRIFTING ARCTIC SEA ICE USING COTS SENSORS

C. U. Hyun and H. C. Kim C. U. Hyun and H. C. Kim
  • Sea ice, Very-high-resolution, Commercial off-the-shelf, UAV, Icebreaker, Helicopter-borne

Keywords: Sea ice, Very-high-resolution, Commercial off-the-shelf, UAV, Icebreaker, Helicopter-borne

Abstract. In order to observe and record conditions of the sea ice efficiently and specifically during in-situ investigation with the support of icebreaker research vessel (IBRV), the very-high-resolution (VHR) imaging systems have been used in recent past. The VHR images are generally acquired lower altitude than cloud height, therefore, the images can be acquired even in unfavourable weather conditions for optical satellite image acquisition, and can be applied to comparison with various kinds of remote sensing datasets. However, producing mosaicked image using the VHR images have suffered from drift of sea ice. The sea ice drift interrupts simultaneous geotagging in overall study area as geographic locations of sea ice moves continuously; therefore, the mosaicked image generated from improperly geotagged individual image depicts a scene of ambiguous time. In this study, we present a case study of VHR sea ice image acquisition using a helicopter equipped with commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) geotagging and imaging sensors with a support of IBRV Araon in East Siberian Sea, Arctic Ocean. We also propose an image mosaicking strategy using the improperly geotagged VHR images acquired over drifting sea ice to decrease temporal and spatial ambiguity.