The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume XLI-B8
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B8, 417–421, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-417-2016
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B8, 417–421, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-417-2016

  23 Jun 2016

23 Jun 2016

DETECTION AND DISCRIMINATION OF THE THICK OIL PATCHES ON THE SEA SURFACE

Dominique Dubucq1, Guillaume Sicot2, Marc Lennon3, and Véronique Miegebielle1 Dominique Dubucq et al.
  • 1TOTAL E&P - 64000 Pau - France
  • 2ENSTA – Bretagne, 29000 Brest
  • 3SAS ACTIMAR – 29200 Brest

Keywords: Oil slick thickness, offshore slick, SWIR, VNIR, optical multispectral data, hyperspectral characterization, reflectance spectra

Abstract. Detection of natural or accidental oil slick at sea surface is important both for exploration purposes and for environment protection. Radar imagery, either satellite or airborne is the prime tool to detect those slicks. Radar is widely used by the national agencies to monitor their maritime areas for accidental pollutions or boat discharges. Radar images can detect oil slick even in the presence of clouds. However the sea surface back scattered energy is rather insensitive to oil thickness. On the contrary several studies tend to prove that optical data may be used to estimate the oil thickness. These data may be in the form of hyperspectral data or thermal infrared data. The objective of this study is to show that SWIR satellite data which are more widely available than hyperspectral data, better resolved than thermal data and available at a very limited cost, can be used to detect and qualitatively assess the thickness of oil slicks. This is important to assess volumes of naturally release oil in the oceans and in case of a crisis to send intervention teams where oil is thickest.