Volume XLI-B8
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B8, 1407-1408, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-1407-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B8, 1407-1408, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-1407-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  14 Oct 2016

14 Oct 2016

ABSOLUTE STANDARDS FOR CLIMATE MEASUREMENTS

J. Leckey J. Leckey
  • National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) Langley Research Center (LARC), Bldg. 1202 MS 468, Hampton, Virginia 23681 USA

Keywords: Infrared, Far-Infrared, Radiance, Climate, Atmosphere, Standard, SI Traceable, Measurement

Abstract. In a world of changing climate, political uncertainty, and ever-changing budgets, the benefit of measurements traceable to SI standards increases by the day. To truly resolve climate change trends on a decadal time scale, on-orbit measurements need to be referenced to something that is both absolute and unchanging. One such mission is the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) that will measure a variety of climate variables with an unprecedented accuracy to definitively quantify climate change. In the CLARREO mission, we will utilize phase change cells in which a material is melted to calibrate the temperature of a blackbody that can then be observed by a spectrometer. A material’s melting point is an unchanging physical constant that, through a series of transfers, can ultimately calibrate a spectrometer on an absolute scale. CLARREO consists of two primary instruments: an infrared (IR) spectrometer and a reflected solar (RS) spectrometer. The mission will contain orbiting radiometers with sufficient accuracy to calibrate other space-based instrumentation and thus transferring the absolute traceability. The status of various mission options will be presented.