Volume XLI-B8
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B8, 1279-1285, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-1279-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B8, 1279-1285, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B8-1279-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  24 Jun 2016

24 Jun 2016

MAPPING SPATIAL MOISTURE CONTENT OF UNSATURATED AGRICULTURAL SOILS WITH GROUND-PENETRATING RADAR

O. Shamir1,3,4,5, N. Goldshleger2,3, U. Basson4, and M. Reshef5 O. Shamir et al.
  • 1Eastern R&D Center, Israel
  • 2Department of Civil Engineering, Ariel University, Israel
  • 3Soil Erosion Research Station, Soil Conservation & Drainage Department, Israel Ministry of Agriculture, Israel
  • 4Geo-Sense Ltd, Israel
  • 5Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Keywords: Ground-penetrating radar, moisture content, agriculture, soil, spatial mapping, active remote sensing

Abstract. Soil subsurface moisture content, especially in the root zone, is important for evaluation the influence of soil moisture to agricultural crops. Conservative monitoring by point-measurement methods is time-consuming and expensive. In this paper we represent an active remote-sensing tool for subsurface spatial imaging and analysis of electromagnetic physical properties, mostly water content, by ground-penetrating radar (GPR) reflection. Combined with laboratory methods, this technique enables real-time and highly accurate evaluations of soils' physical qualities in the field. To calculate subsurface moisture content, a model based on the soil texture, porosity, saturation, organic matter and effective electrical conductivity is required. We developed an innovative method that make it possible measures spatial subsurface moisture content up to a depth of 1.5 m in agricultural soils and applied it to two different unsaturated soil types from agricultural fields in Israel: loess soil type (Calcic haploxeralf), common in rural areas of southern Israel with about 30% clay, 30% silt and 40% sand, and hamra soil type (Typic rhodoxeralf), common in rural areas of central Israel with about 10% clay, 5% silt and 85% sand. Combined field and laboratory measurements and model development gave efficient determinations of spatial moisture content in these fields. The environmentally friendly GPR system enabled non-destructive testing. The developed method for measuring moisture content in the laboratory enabled highly accurate interpretation and physical computing. Spatial soil moisture content to 1.5 m depth was determined with 1–5% accuracy, making our method useful for the design of irrigation plans for different interfaces.