Volume XLI-B5
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B5, 541-548, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B5-541-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XLI-B5, 541-548, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-archives-XLI-B5-541-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  15 Jun 2016

15 Jun 2016

ASSESSMENT OF A STATIC MULTIBEAM SONAR SCANNER FOR 3D SURVEYING IN CONFINED SUBAQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

E. Moisan1,2, P. Charbonnier1, P. Foucher1, P. Grussenmeyer2, S. Guillemin2, O. Samat3, and C. Pagès3 E. Moisan et al.
  • 1Cerema Est, Laboratoire de Strasbourg, 11 rue Jean Mentelin, B.P. 9, 67035 Strasbourg, France
  • 2ICube Laboratory UMR 7357, Photogrammetry and Geomatics Group, INSA Strasbourg, 24 Boulevard de la Victoire, 67084 Strasbourg, France
  • 3SUB-C MARINE, 18 Alfred Nobel - BP 24, 69320 Feyzin, France

Keywords: 3D modelling, accuracy assessment, Mechanical Sonar Scanner, Terrestrial Laser Scanner

Abstract. Mechanical Scanning Sonar (MSS) is a promising technology for surveying underwater environments. Such devices are comprised of a multibeam echosounder attached to a pan & tilt positioner, that allows sweeping the scene in a similar way as Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS). In this paper, we report on the experimental assessment of a recent MSS, namely, the BlueView BV5000, in a confined environment: lock number 50 on the Marne-Rhin canal (France). To this aim, we hung the system upside-down to scan the lock chamber from the surface, which allows surveying the scanning positions, up to an horizontal orientation. We propose a geometric method to estimate the remaining angle and register the scans in a coordinate system attached to the site. After reviewing the different errors that impair sonar data, we compare the resulting point cloud to a TLS model that was acquired the day before, while the lock was completely empty for maintenance. While the results exhibit a bias that can be partly explained by an imperfect setup, the maximum difference is less than 15 cm, and the standard deviation is about 3.5 cm. Visual inspection shows that coarse defects of the masonry, such as stone lacks or cavities, can be detected in the MSS point cloud, while smaller details, e.g. damaged joints, are harder to notice.