Volume XL-5/W2
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XL-5/W2, 61-66, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XL-5-W2-61-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XL-5/W2, 61-66, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XL-5-W2-61-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  19 Jul 2013

19 Jul 2013

3D RECONSTRUCTION AND MODELING OF SUBTERRANEAN LANDSCAPES IN COLLABORATIVE MINING ARCHEOLOGY PROJECTS: TECHNIQUES, APPLICATIONS AND EXPERIENCES

A. Arles3,1, P. Clerc2, G. Sarah3, F. Téreygeol4, G. Bonnamour1, J. Heckes5, and A. Klein5 A. Arles et al.
  • 1Arkemine sarl, Recherche & Archéologie préventive, 26760 Beaumont-les-Valence, France
  • 2INRAP-GES Strasbourg, France
  • 3IRAMAT, Centre Ernest-Babelon, CNRS, Orléans University, France
  • 4IRAMAT, Laboratoire Métallurgies et Cultures, CNRS, Belfort University, France
  • 5Deutsches Bergbau-Museum, Bochum, Germany

Keywords: Photogrammetry, Mining, Underground, 3D Reconstruction, Tool Marks, Radiance Scaling, Archaeology

Abstract. Mining and underground archaeology are two domains of expertise where three-dimensional data take an important part in the associated researches. Up to now, archaeologists study mines and underground networks from line-plot surveys, cross-section of galleries, and from tool marks surveys. All this kind of information can be clearly recorded back from the field from threedimensional models with a more cautious and extensive approach. Besides, the volumes of the underground structures that are very important data to explain the mining activities are difficult to evaluate from "traditional" hand-made recordings. They can now be calculated more accurately from a 3D model. Finally, reconstructed scenes are a powerful tool as thinking aid to look back again to a structure in the office or in future times. And the recorded models, rendered photo-realistically, can also be used for cultural heritage documentation presenting inaccessible and sometimes dangerous places to the public.

Nowadays, thanks to modern computer technologies and highly developed software tools paired with sophisticated digital camera equipment, complex photogrammetric processes are available for moderate costs for research teams.

Recognizing these advantages the authors develop and utilize image-based workflows in order to document ancient mining monuments and underground sites as a basis for further historical and archaeological researches, performed in collaborative partnership during recent projects on medieval silver mines and preventive excavations of undergrounds in France.