Volume XL-4/W1
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XL-4/W1, 31-36, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XL-4-W1-31-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XL-4/W1, 31-36, 2013
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprsarchives-XL-4-W1-31-2013
© Author(s) 2013. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  06 May 2013

06 May 2013

USING GIS TO UNDERSTAND AND PRIORITISE WORKER MOVEMENTS DURING THE 2012 LONDON OLYMPICS

I. M. McGuinness I. M. McGuinness
  • Geospatial Team, Strategic Planning, Regeneration and Olympic Legacy Division, London Borough of Newham, 1000 Dockside Road, London E16 2QU, UK

Keywords: GIS, Modelling, Data Mining, Planning, Urban, Impact Analysis

Abstract. The performance of the transport network and the associated movement of people was one of the most critical elements to London’s successful delivery of the 2012 Olympic Games. During the planning stages Transport for London asked the London Borough of Newham to mitigate the impact of the authority’s 13 500 employees on transport infrastructure close to the Olympic Park. To achieve this, the authority needed to understand the geographic distribution of its workforce and the demand it placed on roads and local transport hubs. The authority’s Geospatial Team led the research based on four cross-referenced data sources, and spatial analysis was used to determine priorities for special absence arrangements and a commissioned coach service. The research was used to support a targeted information campaign but also presented considerations on large-scale data collection, the use of Human Resources data, and the degree to which the movement of people can be measured and managed.