Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XL-7/W3, 203-206, 2015
http://www.int-arch-photogramm-remote-sens-spatial-inf-sci.net/XL-7-W3/203/2015/
doi:10.5194/isprsarchives-XL-7-W3-203-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
 
28 Apr 2015
Data and techniques for studying the urban heat island effect in Johannesburg
C. H. Hardy and A. L. Nel Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Keywords: Urban Heat Island, Remote Sensing, Thermal Infrared, Land Surface Temperature, Multi-temporal Abstract. The city of Johannesburg contains over 10 million trees and is often referred to as an urban forest. The intra-urban spatial variability of the levels of vegetation across Johannesburg’s residential regions has an influence on the urban heat island effect within the city. Residential areas with high levels of vegetation benefit from cooling due to evapo-transpirative processes and thus exhibit weaker heat island effects; while their impoverished counterparts are not so fortunate. The urban heat island effect describes a phenomenon where some urban areas exhibit temperatures that are warmer than that of surrounding areas. The factors influencing the urban heat island effect include the high density of people and buildings and low levels of vegetative cover within populated urban areas. This paper describes the remote sensing data sets and the processing techniques employed to study the heat island effect within Johannesburg. In particular we consider the use of multi-sensorial multi-temporal remote sensing data towards a predictive model, based on the analysis of influencing factors.
Conference paper (PDF, 3427 KB)


Citation: Hardy, C. H. and Nel, A. L.: Data and techniques for studying the urban heat island effect in Johannesburg, Int. Arch. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., XL-7/W3, 203-206, doi:10.5194/isprsarchives-XL-7-W3-203-2015, 2015.

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